Valerie Gresser PLEASANT RIDGE ELEMENTARY, KNOXVILLE, TN
1st Grade ELA : Unit #1 - Reading Comprehension : Lesson #7

Cause and Effect with "A Bad Case of Stripes" Day One

Objective: SWBAT write about the cause and effect with the story "A Bad Case of Stripes"
Standards: RL.1.3 RL.1.7 SL.1.4 SL.1.6
Subject(s): English / Language Arts
60 minutes
1 Teacher Notes and Materials - 0 minutes

I have an interactive whiteboard lesson for you with this lesson that has four days worth of activities.  I prepared this lesson over a year ago when I only had about 20- 30 minutes to do a whole group reading lesson.  This year, I have an hour allotted for whole group reading, so I am able to do two days worth of work in one day.  I left the flipchart as is, since I didn't know how much time you have for a whole group lesson.  Just know that each day's worth of activities should be about 20 minutes.

 

For this lesson you will need to download the interactive whiteboard lesson.  You will also need the book "A Bad Case of Stripes" by David Shannon.  You will also need to copy enough student packets for each of your students.  If you don't have this particular book there are many other books you can use to teach cause and effect. I found an excellent website that has many suggestions.  Click here to see some other great pictures books you could use to teach cause and effect.  Since I made the student packets in a Word document you can also easily change the student form to fit your needs.

Differentiating Your Student Packets
Advanced Students

     After teaching this lesson, I analyzed my student work.  I know I had already had the sentence stems written for my students for the sentence writing part.  I know that this is how I can still differentiate for my struggling students.  This will help them in their sentence writing because they need that support.  However, I realized that I was offering too much support for my advanced students by offering this stem for them.  I am always encouraging my students to speak and write in complete sentences.  If I don't make my advanced students write the whole sentence, I am not allowing them the opportunity to respond to questions and write the response in a full sentence.  So, I went back and made plain lined paper for the packets for my advanced students.  Next time I teach this lesson I will make two types of packets.  I will have the sentences with the stems for my struggling students and packets with plain paper for my advanced students.

2 Reading, Discussing, and Writing the First and Second Events - 10 minutes

     Since going through Common Core training I have learned that young children learn through speaking.  The more I get them to talk about the content, the better their achievement becomes.  Before I started the lesson, I partnered my students up and they were sitting next to each other at their tables.  They also had their packets out.  I began reading the story and read  the first few pages where she became covered with stripes. 

     I then referred back to the flipchart.  I said, " Let's look at our multi-flow map.  The event is that Camilla wanted to fit in with her friends.  What is the effect of that? Partner 1 got to talk and I gave them about 2 minutes.  The class agreed that the effect was she wouldn't eat her lima beans so the students wrote that in their effect box. 

I then said,  "Let's look at the second part of our packet.  The event is that Camilla wouldn't eat lima beans.  What is the effect of that?  This time Person 2 got to talk first. Again I gave the class about 2 minutes to talk. The class  agreed that Camilla became covered with stripes and that's what they wrote in the effect box. 

3 Writing Complete Sentences about the First and Second Events - 10 minutes

     I really want my students to be able to speak and write in complete sentences.  We are focusing a lot of time on this skill this year.  I turned to the page in the flipchart where we wrote our sentences.  I focused on the first sentence stem.  I said, "The first stem says, Camilla wanted to fit in with her friends so ___________.  Now what are we going to say?"   Can you believe my class looked at me like a deer caught in the headlights?  They didn't make the connection between what we had written in the first effect box on our multi-flow map and what we were supposed to write in this sentence. So, I redirected them back to the other page on my flipchart and said, "What did we just write about that in our first effect box?" When I looked back at them I could see the light bulbs clicking.  I said, "Now that you know what to say I want Person 1 to start with the stem and finish the rest of the sentence.  Let's practice speaking our complete sentence before we write it.  Go."  Then I circulated around the room, listening to make sure children were speaking in complete sentences and not making any syntactical errors. Once we had practiced I let them complete the sentence by finishing the stem. 

   After they were finished writing the first sentence I said, "Let's look at the second stem on the board.  It says, Camilla wouldn't eat lima beans so____________.   I directed them back to what they had already written and had Person 2 practice speaking. Then all students completed the sentence by finishing the stem. 

4 Reading, Discussing, and Writing the Third and Fourth Events - 10 minutes

     I continued reading the story.  I read to the part of the story where Camilla kept changing faster than you can turn channels on TV.  I turned to the next page on the flipchart where we had our multi-flow map.  I said, "The event is that Camilla's stripes turned red, white, and blue and she broke out in stars.  What caused that to happen? Person 2 got to talk first this time. The class agreed that it was because the class said the Pledge of Allegience and they wrote this in the cause box. 

     I turned to the next page on the flipchart and said, "The event is that Camilla kept changing faster than you could turn channels on a TV.  What caused this to happen? Person 1 got to talk this time.  As I was circulating around the room I could tell the students weren't quite sure of the answer.  I stopped the talking and said, "We have a lot of confusion about what caused this.  Let me read this part of the story again.  Listen really closely. "  I read that part of the story again.  You will find that sometimes your students will get confused or you may ask a question and all you get are "crickets - absolute quiet."  Don't worry.  Just redirect your students back to the story and read that part again.  This is exactly what I did to redirect my kiddos.

     After I had read that part again and the kids were on track again I had person 1 finish talking.  I said, "Now who can tell me what caused this?  That's right.  Students kept calling out shapes and colors.  Go ahead and write that in the cause box." I gave them several minutes to write the cause in the cause box. 

5 Writing Complete Sentences about the Third and Fourth Events - 10 minutes

  Just as we did with the first and second events, we wanted to practice speaking and writing in complete sentences.  I turned to the page in the flipchart where we wrote our  next set of sentences.  I focused on the first sentence stem.  I said, "The first stem says, Camilla's stripes turned red, white, and blue and she broke out in stars because ____________.   I had Person 1 talk to their partner. I circulated around the room, listening to make sure children were speaking in complete sentences and not making any syntactical errors.  Once students wer done talking, I gave them time to finish their sentence stems. 

        After they were finished writing the first sentence I said, "Let's look at the second stem on the board.  It says, Camilla kept changing faster than you can change channels on a TV because ____________.  This time it was Person 2's turn to talk. They practiced speaking to their partner.  I circulated around the room listening for syntactical errors. Once students were done speaking, they finished their sentence stems. 

      I have included a video of several of the different parts of the lesson as a resource in this section  so you can get an idea of the flow of the lesson.  After the reading of the story, the speaking with partners and the writing, time does add up but the students stay engaged and on task.

6 Closure - 2 minutes

At this point, the lesson was about 40 minutes long and I thought this was enough for the day.  If a lesson becomes too long students lose interest and that's when behavior problems start.  I said, "We have done a great deal of work on cause and effect today with our story.  We will finish the story tomorrow. Before we end for the day who can tell me an important event and why it happened?"

I am really big about making students independent and organized.  I told the students they would need their packets for tomorrow's lesson and to put it in their yellow folder, then they would be able to find their packet right away.